Numismatics / erotic tokens and coins

erotic tokens and coins

Ancient Greece

The ancient Greeks did not generally have trouble viewing the naked human bodies. Nudity in the ancient world was regarded as a natural aspect of life. Evidenced by the number of preserved art and craft artifacts - sculptures, ceramics, as well as coins. Rare, however, are clearly a representation of characters in sexual positions, such as a satyr and nymph on archaic Greek coins from Macedonia and from the island of Thassos.

Ancient Rome

In Roman times it is not known direct representation of sexual themes on coins (currency), although the nude figures on the coins were displayed normally. Besides the standard coin minted by the Romans as well as special orders - metal tokens called tesserae, which were distributed on different occasions and served as a ticket to such performances in the circus.

Specific tessera of 1 century. chips are rare erotic called spintriae that were originally minted in bronze. One side shows the token act of love - every man and woman, the other side bears a Roman numeral in the wreath. Known as the numbers I to XVI, with numbers higher than 13 are very rare.

Today only guess for what purpose were these chips manufactured. Some experts say that their main function was to enter a public house and pumping services displayed on the token. Representation services allegedly to overcome language barriers between nations throughout the Roman Empire, for example, Syrian sailor who had just arrived in Rome and did not know a word of Latin, as shown in Figure knew exactly what he will. According to others, however, was a special gambling chips, similar to today's erotic cards, or chips used in the numerical one of board games.

Parallel to those of Roman erotic tokens are tokens used as circus tickets or vouchers for food scoops. These usually carried on one side a portrait of the emperor. But see the emperor on a chip with erotic themes were nemyslitelé so rubní spintrií party bears the numeric designation, perhaps the value of the chip. According to the currently most widespread opinion, really was a voucher for sexual services, which were distributed free of charge, but not as much as bread and chips in the game.

Renaissance

The Renaissance was trying to build on ancient Greek and Roman art, and drew from it. The form of the male penis was a symbol for the ancient Greeks and the generative forces of nature itself was a sign fallos satyr wine god Dionysus guides. These satyrs depicted in the Renaissance, then lust, like Pan, the god of herds and hunting, which coincide. They are demons wild, untamed PRE-families. The Greek word pan means all - permeates all things. Head composed of penises shows that its owner does not think of anything else, medals depicts natural, uncultivated controlling male sexuality. Motive was 16th in Italy century unusual, such as Francesco Urbino decked head composed of penises playful majolica plate from between 1530 - the 1537th

1-7 of 7 total

Rome, erotic token Spintria VIIII, 1st century, tin replica

Catalog number: ETC08

Your Price: 5.00 €

   

Material: Tin. Size circa 23 mm.

The rare Roman erotic tokens dating back to the 1st century, called Spintriae, were originally struck from an alloy of brass/bronze. One side of the token depicts the sexual act – always a man with a woman, while the other side bears a Roman numeral within a wreath. The numbers I to XVI are known, with numbers exceeding XIII being very rare. We do not know today why the tokens were made. Some experts claim that the main function was to gain admission to brothels and draw the service depicted on the token. It is thought that the depiction of the service was to overcome the language barrier between the peoples of the Roman Empire; for example, a Syrian sailor who just arrived in Rome without knowing a word in Latin would know exactly what to expect based on the illustration. Some theorise they were special gaming tokens similar to contemporary erotic cards or numerical tokens used in some board games. These erotic tokens had a parallel in the Roman tokens serving as admission tickets to the circus and the then meal vouchers. The latter mostly bore the portrait of the emperor on one side. Yet it was unthinkable to depict the emperor on a token with erotic motifs, and the reverse side of the Spintriae therefore bears a numerical designation, perhaps the value of the token. According to the currently prevailing opinion, they were indeed tokens for sexual services, which were distributed for free, although not as extensively as the tokens for bread and circuses.

More info

Rome, erotic token Spintria X, 1st century, tin replica

Catalog number: 01

Your Price: 5.00 €

   

Material: Tin. Size circa 23 mm.

The rare Roman erotic tokens dating back to the 1st century, called Spintriae, were originally struck from an alloy of brass/bronze. One side of the token depicts the sexual act – always a man with a woman, while the other side bears a Roman numeral within a wreath. The numbers I to XVI are known, with numbers exceeding XIII being very rare. We do not know today why the tokens were made. Some experts claim that the main function was to gain admission to brothels and draw the service depicted on the token. It is thought that the depiction of the service was to overcome the language barrier between the peoples of the Roman Empire; for example, a Syrian sailor who just arrived in Rome without knowing a word in Latin would know exactly what to expect based on the illustration. Some theorise they were special gaming tokens similar to contemporary erotic cards or numerical tokens used in some board games. These erotic tokens had a parallel in the Roman tokens serving as admission tickets to the circus and the then meal vouchers. The latter mostly bore the portrait of the emperor on one side. Yet it was unthinkable to depict the emperor on a token with erotic motifs, and the reverse side of the Spintriae therefore bears a numerical designation, perhaps the value of the token. According to the currently prevailing opinion, they were indeed tokens for sexual services, which were distributed for free, although not as extensively as the tokens for bread and circuses.

More info

Rome, erotic token Spintria VII, 1st century, tin replica

Catalog number: 03

Your Price: 5.00 €

   

Material: Tin. Size circa 23 mm.

The rare Roman erotic tokens dating back to the 1st century, called Spintriae, were originally struck from an alloy of brass/bronze. One side of the token depicts the sexual act – always a man with a woman, while the other side bears a Roman numeral within a wreath. The numbers I to XVI are known, with numbers exceeding XIII being very rare. We do not know today why the tokens were made. Some experts claim that the main function was to gain admission to brothels and draw the service depicted on the token. It is thought that the depiction of the service was to overcome the language barrier between the peoples of the Roman Empire; for example, a Syrian sailor who just arrived in Rome without knowing a word in Latin would know exactly what to expect based on the illustration. Some theorise they were special gaming tokens similar to contemporary erotic cards or numerical tokens used in some board games. These erotic tokens had a parallel in the Roman tokens serving as admission tickets to the circus and the then meal vouchers. The latter mostly bore the portrait of the emperor on one side. Yet it was unthinkable to depict the emperor on a token with erotic motifs, and the reverse side of the Spintriae therefore bears a numerical designation, perhaps the value of the token. According to the currently prevailing opinion, they were indeed tokens for sexual services, which were distributed for free, although not as extensively as the tokens for bread and circuses.

More info

Rome, erotic token Spintria XIII, 1st century, tin replica

Catalog number: ETC04

Your Price: 5.00 €

   

Material: Tin. Size circa 23 mm.

The rare Roman erotic tokens dating back to the 1st century, called Spintriae, were originally struck from an alloy of brass/bronze. One side of the token depicts the sexual act – always a man with a woman, while the other side bears a Roman numeral within a wreath. The numbers I to XVI are known, with numbers exceeding XIII being very rare. We do not know today why the tokens were made. Some experts claim that the main function was to gain admission to brothels and draw the service depicted on the token. It is thought that the depiction of the service was to overcome the language barrier between the peoples of the Roman Empire; for example, a Syrian sailor who just arrived in Rome without knowing a word in Latin would know exactly what to expect based on the illustration. Some theorise they were special gaming tokens similar to contemporary erotic cards or numerical tokens used in some board games. These erotic tokens had a parallel in the Roman tokens serving as admission tickets to the circus and the then meal vouchers. The latter mostly bore the portrait of the emperor on one side. Yet it was unthinkable to depict the emperor on a token with erotic motifs, and the reverse side of the Spintriae therefore bears a numerical designation, perhaps the value of the token. According to the currently prevailing opinion, they were indeed tokens for sexual services, which were distributed for free, although not as extensively as the tokens for bread and circuses.

More info

Rome, erotic token Spintria V, 1st century, tin replica

Catalog number: ETC05

Your Price: 5.00 €

   

Material: Tin. Size circa 23 mm.

The rare Roman erotic tokens dating back to the 1st century, called Spintriae, were originally struck from an alloy of brass/bronze. One side of the token depicts the sexual act – always a man with a woman, while the other side bears a Roman numeral within a wreath. The numbers I to XVI are known, with numbers exceeding XIII being very rare. We do not know today why the tokens were made. Some experts claim that the main function was to gain admission to brothels and draw the service depicted on the token. It is thought that the depiction of the service was to overcome the language barrier between the peoples of the Roman Empire; for example, a Syrian sailor who just arrived in Rome without knowing a word in Latin would know exactly what to expect based on the illustration. Some theorise they were special gaming tokens similar to contemporary erotic cards or numerical tokens used in some board games. These erotic tokens had a parallel in the Roman tokens serving as admission tickets to the circus and the then meal vouchers. The latter mostly bore the portrait of the emperor on one side. Yet it was unthinkable to depict the emperor on a token with erotic motifs, and the reverse side of the Spintriae therefore bears a numerical designation, perhaps the value of the token. According to the currently prevailing opinion, they were indeed tokens for sexual services, which were distributed for free, although not as extensively as the tokens for bread and circuses.

More info

Rome, erotic token Spintria VI, 1st century, tin replica

Catalog number: ETC06

Your Price: 5.00 €

   

Material: Tin. Size circa 23 mm.

The rare Roman erotic tokens dating back to the 1st century, called Spintriae, were originally struck from an alloy of brass/bronze. One side of the token depicts the sexual act – always a man with a woman, while the other side bears a Roman numeral within a wreath. The numbers I to XVI are known, with numbers exceeding XIII being very rare. We do not know today why the tokens were made. Some experts claim that the main function was to gain admission to brothels and draw the service depicted on the token. It is thought that the depiction of the service was to overcome the language barrier between the peoples of the Roman Empire; for example, a Syrian sailor who just arrived in Rome without knowing a word in Latin would know exactly what to expect based on the illustration. Some theorise they were special gaming tokens similar to contemporary erotic cards or numerical tokens used in some board games. These erotic tokens had a parallel in the Roman tokens serving as admission tickets to the circus and the then meal vouchers. The latter mostly bore the portrait of the emperor on one side. Yet it was unthinkable to depict the emperor on a token with erotic motifs, and the reverse side of the Spintriae therefore bears a numerical designation, perhaps the value of the token. According to the currently prevailing opinion, they were indeed tokens for sexual services, which were distributed for free, although not as extensively as the tokens for bread and circuses.

More info

Rome, erotic token Spintria III, 1st century, tin replica

Catalog number: ETC07

Your Price: 5.00 €

   

Material: Tin. Size circa 23 mm.

The rare Roman erotic tokens dating back to the 1st century, called Spintriae, were originally struck from an alloy of brass/bronze. One side of the token depicts the sexual act – always a man with a woman, while the other side bears a Roman numeral within a wreath. The numbers I to XVI are known, with numbers exceeding XIII being very rare. We do not know today why the tokens were made. Some experts claim that the main function was to gain admission to brothels and draw the service depicted on the token. It is thought that the depiction of the service was to overcome the language barrier between the peoples of the Roman Empire; for example, a Syrian sailor who just arrived in Rome without knowing a word in Latin would know exactly what to expect based on the illustration. Some theorise they were special gaming tokens similar to contemporary erotic cards or numerical tokens used in some board games. These erotic tokens had a parallel in the Roman tokens serving as admission tickets to the circus and the then meal vouchers. The latter mostly bore the portrait of the emperor on one side. Yet it was unthinkable to depict the emperor on a token with erotic motifs, and the reverse side of the Spintriae therefore bears a numerical designation, perhaps the value of the token. According to the currently prevailing opinion, they were indeed tokens for sexual services, which were distributed for free, although not as extensively as the tokens for bread and circuses.

More info

Products
We recommend
swords
New products
Webdesign by aliacom and pictus
0.00 €
Advanced
Shipping Worldwide Info