antiquity - roman, greek sculptures

Antiquity - roman, greek sculptures

Replicas of Sculptures (Greece, Ancient Rome). In the Classical Period in Greece we meet with beautifully depicted Gods and Goddesses, boys (often nude) and girls. Man as such was idealized and the Greeks tried to depict him as beautifully as possible. In the later Hellenistic period we see a wider array of motifs, which included childhood, old age, death, people engaged in ordinary professions, and there is an attempt to capture movement and states of mind. Statues were painted or gilded and had stones in their eye sockets. They were often draped with fabrics or covered with bronze or gold sheets. Dozens of them would be installed in temples or other holy places. Generally, their facial features had little individuality, and the period’s erotic statues (such as statues of Aphrodite) were no exception. Smaller clay statues served as votive gifts to the gods as well as decorations.
 
The Romans were influenced by Etruscan art (especially tombs and sarcophagi: stone cases for coffins), but usually they reproduced Greek artwork. Some of the Greek originals were lost to the ages, and have only been preserved for us only in the Roman copies. However, while the Greeks often used bronze in their works, the Romans preferred marble. Like the Greeks, they also preferred their statues to be colourful, but there were other differences: they were partial to realistic likenesses of politicians and emperors, sometimes rendered as equestrian statues, and had a fondness for portraits of children as well. Some other important works are reliefs carved into triumphal arches and victory columns - such as Trajan’s Column in Rome - that commemorate historic events. One more category is of small, luxurious items: these include statues decorated with precious materials, or carvings and intaglios carved into gemstone cameos and signet rings or into shells or glass.

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  • Replicas of Sculptures (Greece, Ancient Rome). In the Classical Period in Greece we meet with beautifully depicted Gods and Goddesses, boys (often nude) and girls. Man as such was idealized and the Greeks tried to depict him as beautifully as possible. In the later Hellenistic period we see a wider array of motifs, which included childhood, old age, death, people engaged in ordinary professions, and there is an attempt to capture movement and states of mind. Statues were painted or gilded and had stones in their eye sockets. They were often draped with fabrics or covered with bronze or gold sheets. Dozens of them would be installed in temples or other holy places. Generally, their facial features had little individuality, and the period’s erotic statues (such as statues of Aphrodite) were no exception. Smaller clay statues served as votive gifts to the gods as well as decorations.
     
    The Romans were influenced by Etruscan art (especially tombs and sarcophagi: stone cases for coffins), but usually they reproduced Greek artwork. Some of the Greek originals were lost to the ages, and have only been preserved for us only in the Roman copies. However, while the Greeks often used bronze in their works, the Romans preferred marble. Like the Greeks, they also preferred their statues to be colourful, but there were other differences: they were partial to realistic likenesses of politicians and emperors, sometimes rendered as equestrian statues, and had a fondness for portraits of children as well. Some other important works are reliefs carved into triumphal arches and victory columns - such as Trajan’s Column in Rome - that commemorate historic events. One more category is of small, luxurious items: these include statues decorated with precious materials, or carvings and intaglios carved into gemstone cameos and signet rings or into shells or glass.