ancient swords - celtic, roman

Ancient swords - celtic, roman

Celtic and Roman Swords. The ancient world is our true passion. We are constantly working to develop and improve our line of ancient weapons, combining various materials (steel, wood, bronze, bone) and refining the techniques for producing them in order to get our replicas as close as possible to their originals. In the Iron Age collection we offer forged Celtic swords and antropomorphic daggers with bronze handles. The adversaries of the Celtic Gauls – the  Romans – used the gladius sword. Our collection also includes Greek, Thracian and Dacian swords (falx), and gladiators’ weapons.

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47.51 $1 215.48 $
  • New
    CELTIC SWORD, replica, S. Maria di Zevio, Italy, LT D1
    $607.74 Catalogue number: ASW77 In stock
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  • -22%
    ROMAN PILUM, replica
    $386.74
    $301.66
    Catalogue number: ASW75 In stock
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  • $518.23 Catalogue number: ASW71 In stock
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  • New
    GLADIUS for gladiators, blunt sword
    $352.49 Catalogue number: ASW745 In stock
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  • New
    GLADIUS type POMPEII, blunt
    $396.69 Catalogue number: ASW764 In stock
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  • New
    GLADIATOR'S SICA, Thracian short sword
    $396.69 Catalogue number: ASW475 In stock
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  • New
    Gladiatorial Dagger, Pompeii, 1st century, replica
    $436.47 Catalogue number: GLA07 In stock
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  • New
    CELTIC SWORD, replica, Early Iron Age, La Téne
    $555.80 Catalogue number: ASW78 In stock
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  • $47.51 Catalogue number: COS23 In stock
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  • -11%
    ROMAN PILUM, replica
    $408.84
    $362.43
    Catalogue number: ASW76 In stock
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  • $217.13 Catalogue number: ASW50 In stock
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  • $301.66 Catalogue number: ASW41 In stock
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  • $364.64 Catalogue number: ASW42 In stock
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  • $529.28 Catalogue number: ASW39 In stock
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  • $280.66 Catalogue number: ASW35 In stock
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  • -3%
    FALX, Dacian Sickle, Two Handed Weapon
    $364.64
    $354.70
    Catalogue number: ASW29 In stock
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  • $343.65 Catalogue number: ASW11 In stock
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  • -3%
    FIONN, Forged Celtic Chieftain Sword
    $486.19
    $470.72
    Catalogue number: ASW58 8-12 weeks
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  • Celtic Swords

    One of the first ethnic groups to appear on the European continent north of the Alps, albeit through the written records of their southern neighbors - the Greeks and Romans - were the Celts. The homeland of the Celts was probably in Central Europe. Whether they were Gauls, as the Latin name for the Celts goes, or later, after them, Germans and Slavs, all left their mark on the Czech landscape. However, let's turn to the material culture left behind by these ancient inhabitants of Bohemia, as our homeland is called after the Celtic tribe of the Boii. In addition to coins, called "duhovky," neck rings (torques), and other objects, special attention deserves Celtic swords, which brought fame to Celtic blacksmiths as far as the Apennine Peninsula and were the inspiration for the creation of the legendary sword of all swords - King Arthur's Excalibur. The Celtic sword was a clear symbol of power for the Celtic aristocracy, and its possession was both a privilege and a commitment. Celtic society did not know slavery in the form we encounter in Mediterranean cultures; however, there was a very strong client relationship here. The aristocracy held secular power and, along with it, the obligation to defend their "subjects." The sword was often passed from father to son, just as the power of the nobility was passed on to descendants. Many swords had extensive stories told about them, and they are still told today. When Macedonian King Philip II was killed in 336 BC, it was allegedly with a Celtic sword.

    The sword was often a sacrifice to the gods, as evidenced by finds in peat bogs and marshes. In such cases, the sword was bent so that it could no longer be used. Much stranger is the decoration of many swords, which have figurative ornamentation. It seems that the sword was often perceived as animated, as a living being. This was reflected in the decoration, which took on animal and plant motifs. These likely had spiritual significance and referred to various mythical figures, such as the God-Stag Cernunnos.

    Nevertheless, despite this ritual accent, the sword always remained a weapon, a military tool. The Celts often fought from war chariots, although there certainly was infantry as well. However, in both cases, the sword, along with the spear, lance, and shield, was part of the military equipment, as archaeological finds show. The youngest found Celtic swords date back to the 1st century BC.

    In the context of advanced Celtic metallurgy, it is nothing unusual that iron was the predominant material. After all, it was the Celts who contributed to the spread of the use of this metal. Even Caesar admired Celtic blacksmithing. The Celtic sword thus became a symbol of the Gallic blacksmith's skill.